Cricket Players Photo

Monday, 5 March 2012

Asad Shafiq

Asad Shafiq Biography


Asad Shafiq (Urdu: اسد شفیق, born 28 January 1986 in Karachi) is a Pakistani international cricketer. A right-hand batsman and occasional leg-break bowler, he made his One Day International debut against Bangladesh in the Asia Cup on 21 June 2010.[1]

He has played for Karachi Whites, Karachi Blues, Karachi Dolphins, Karachi Zebras, North West Frontier Province and Sind.
Shafiq made his International debut against Bangladesh in the 2010 Asia Cup at the Rangiri Dambulla International Stadium he scored 17 runs from 19 balls and was stumped by Mushfiqur Rahim in what was a dead rubber as neither side could progress to the final. Shafiq was next selected when three Pakistani players were involved in Spot-fixing allegations the three players Mohammad Aamer, Mohammad Asif and test captain Salman Butt Shafiq was selected along side fast bowler emerging fast-bowler Mohammad Irfan. He got his maiden fifty in ODI cricket against England on the 12th of September 2010.[2]

On the back of his good performances during the tour he was selected to play in the five-match ODI series against South Africa and a two-match test series against them as well [3] He was promoted to opener in the first two ODI's and struggled in the role, therefore he was moved down the order to his preferred number 4 position just below Younis Khan, Shafiq excelled in that position and displayed his talent as a batsman. He was however rested for the final ODI in place of veteran Mohammad Yousuf.

Shafiq was not selected for the first test match in the two match test series against South Africa but after a horrible stroke by Umar Akmal he made his debut in the following match scoring 61 in his debut innings but not getting a chance to bat in the second innings as Pakistan already managed to salvage a draw.Shafiq was selected for the New Zealand series but didn't play the first Twenty20 International, Pakistan performed poorly and therefore Shafiq was given his Twenty20 debut in the following match in place of left-handed Fawad Alam. He played both tests in the series, which Pakistan won 1-0. During the first match of the series Shafiq scored 83 in the first innings and was not required to bat in the second innings as Pakistan won by 10 wickets.

Shafiq was selected for Pakistan's 2011 World Cup squad but did not play in the first four matches, before making his debut against Zimbabawe in the fifth match, inplace of an injured Umar Akmal, in which he scored his highest ODI score of 78*, guiding Pakistan to a 7 wicket win. In his last match against Australia, Shafiq has played a very matured inning of a composed 46 runs, anchoring and setting up a good platform for later players to finish a win - putting the Pakistani team at the top of their pool. He also scored a watchful 30 runs against India in the semi-final in Mohali.

Shafiq scored his first test century in the opening Test of Pakistan's two-match series against Bangladesh in December 2011. He scored 104 runs in Pakistan's first innings.[4] He played in all three Tests of Pakistan's series against England in the United Arab Emirates in early 2012, scoring 167 runs at an average of 33.40 as Pakistan won the series 3–0.


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 Asad Shafiq
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Asad Shafiq First 100 In Test Vs Bangladesh 2011 HD
Asad Shafiq - Mr Solid

Sohail Tanvir

Sohail Tanvir Biography


Sohail Tanvir (Punjabi : سہیل تنویر, born December 12, 1984 in Rawalpindi, Punjab) is a Pakistani cricketer, who has gained repute for his unorthodox left arm bowling action and particularly for the success it has gained him in the Twenty20 format of the game.
An allrounder, he is a hard-hitting left-handed batsman and an unorthodox left-arm fast-medium bowler who also bowls occasional left-arm orthodox spin. Despite not having taken a single wicket during his ten Twenty20 matches domestically, he was selected for Pakistan's squad for the inaugural World Twenty20 after Shoaib Akhtar was sent home. He made his Twenty20 debut in the tournament, and took six wickets in six matches, with best bowling figures of 3 for 31 in four overs against Australia. Though considered an allrounder, Tanvir did not get a chance to bat in the tournament until the final, where he made his first international runs, with a six off his first ball, aiding Pakistan back into the game.

After impressing in the ICC World Twenty20, he was selected to play in the ODI series against South Africa in October, 2007. He was then selected for the tour of India, and took eight wickets in the ODI series. He also took part in the Test series that followed, making his debut in place of the injured Umar Gul. On debut at the Feroz Shah Kotla in Dehli, he took three wickets which included his first international Test cricket causality Sourav Ganguly and Rahul Dravid. In Asia Cricket Cup, June 2008, Pakistan played their first game against Hong Kong at Karachi. In that match, Pakistan's top order struggled to get grips with Hong Kong bowlers before Sohail Tanvir set up a 100 run stand along with Fawad Alam for the 8th wicket. Sohail scored his maiden ODI 50 in that match. He scored 59 off just 55 balls which took Pakistan to a respectable score of 288. After that, in the match vs. Sri Lanka, Tanvir took his first 5 wickets haul. He ended at 5/48 in 10 overs. After the 2009 ICC World Twenty20.
On March 11, 2008 Tanvir was signed up in the second round of the Indian Premier League's players' auction by the Jaipur franchise, Rajasthan Royals, for $100,000.[9]

Playing in his third match of tournament, on May 4, Tanvir took a match-winning six wickets against the Chennai Super Kings at the Sawai Mansingh Stadium, Jaipur. His figures of 6-14 from four overs are a record for Twenty20 cricket.[10][11] He ended the tournament as the highest wicket-taker, with 22 wickets from 11 matches at an average of 12.09, an economy rate of 6.46 and a strike rate of 11.20, the best among bowlers with more than six wickets.[12][13]

In the final of tournament, on June 1 at the Dr DY Patil Sports Academy in Mumbai, with Rajasthan chasing 164 to win, Tanvir added 21 runs along with captain Shane Warne. He hit the winning runs of the final ball of the innings, to see the Royals home.[14][15] He was later presented with the "Purple Cap", an award for the leading wicket-taker of the tournament.

A statistical analysis conducted by Cricinfo after the conclusion of the league stage of the tournament rated Tanvir as the most successful player. He was also rated as the second best value player of the tournament, having been signed on for $100,000.[16]

Tanvir met with controversy when he was quoted on Pakistani television saying "the Hindu's are of such nature" after being snubbed by IPL.

Sohail Tanvir
Sohail Tanvir
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Sohail Tanvir 2 Wickets Against India 3rd ODI 2007
Sohail Tanvir Kisses Gautam Gambhir

Asim Kamal

Asim Kamal Biography

A left-hander of more obduracy than flair, Asim Kamal is the sort of batsman who can bind the middle order together, allowing others to bat around him. He is typically minimalist, particularly well equipped with a fluid cover-drive, but his meat and drink are nudged singles and patient spells of batting. After five seasons of domestic cricket, Kamal finally made his Test debut against South Africa, at the relatively ripe age of 27. Like so many others of late, Kamal was impressive in his first match, missing out on a hundred by just one run. Coming back into side for the Tests against India, Kamal continued to impress. In a series where most of Pakistan's batsmen gained notoriety for throwing their wickets away, Kamal showed rare discipline and composure, batting well with the tail to score two half-centuries. He further consolidated his reputation as a gritty customer during Pakistan's 2005 tour of India, scoring 91 in the first innings of the first Test. His safe catching at gully came in handy on several occasions on the same tour. However, his consistency slipped in the following months and he spent a three-year exile from the squad. He was the subject of contentious debate among several selection committees and captains before finally earning a recall during the home series against Sri Lanka in 2009.
A gritty left handed middle order batsman who has been a firm favourite with Pakistani fans but not the selectors. Not exactly eye catching but nonetheless very effective. A very fine driver of the ball who represented Pakistan in 12 tests and averaged just over 37.

Perhaps the fact that Asim failed to score a century in any of his 20 test innings counted against him. On debut against South Africa he made 99 and showed what an excellent temperament he had. Asim showed time and again what a good player he was batting with the tailenders but sadly he has been out of favour since 2005 and these days struggles to even make his domestic team of Habib Bank.

Sadly harshly treated by the selectors and now another player lost to the wilderness.


Asim Kamal 
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Asim Kamal - Ball Stuck to his Helmet
Asif Kamal

Mohammad Younus Khan

Mohammad Younus Khan Biography


Mohammad Younus Khan (Pashto, Urdu: محمد یونس خان) (born 29 November 1977) is a Pakistani cricketer and former captain of the Pakistan national cricket team. Younus' name is often spelled Younis Khan, but he has been quoted as saying, "My name is Younus Khan. I tell people that everywhere, but they don’t listen."[2] He is only the third Pakistani player to score 300 or more runs in an innings.[3]

On 10 March 2010, Younus, along with another player, Mohammad Yousuf were axed by the Pakistan Cricket Board from playing for Pakistan in any format for an indefinite period, following an inquiry report which suggested that both the player were involved in breaches of discipline by inciting divisions within the team.[4] The ban was overturned three months later.[5] Presently Younus is a key member in the ODI and Test match side, by February 2012 Younus reached his 20th test match century against England
Younus Khan made his international debut in an ODI against Sri Lanka at Karachi in February 2000, and has since played over 150 ODIs for Pakistan. He has also played in over 50 Test matches. Younus was one of the few batsmen who retained his place in the team after Pakistan's disastrous World Cup campaign in 2003, but lost it soon after due to a string of poor scores in the home series against Bangladesh and South Africa. He came back for the one-day series against India, but failed to cement a place in the Test side.

It was his return to the side in October 2004, at the pivotal one-down, against Sri Lanka in Karachi that laid the groundwork for his emergence as a force in Pakistan cricket. He was the top run-getter in the disastrous 3–0 whitewash in Australia immediately after and on the tour of India, for which Younus was elevated to vice-captain, he blossomed. After a horror start to the series he came back strongly, capping things off with 267 in the final Test. It was his highest Test score and came off 504 balls in the first innings, to set up a series levelling victory in Bangalore.

As well as being an accomplished batsman, Younus is also a skilled slip fielder and a very occasional leg-spin bowler. He has performed particularly well outside Pakistan, including on tours of Australia, India, England and Sri Lanka. In the six Tests he has played against India, Younus averages an exceptional 106, the highest average against India by a Pakistani.[7] Apart from his 267 at Bangalore, Younus also made 147 at Kolkata in 2005 and a pair of centuries during India's trip to Pakistan in 2006. More importantly, the tour to India also showcased his potential as a future captain of Pakistan and his energetic and astute leadership has impressed many people. Also in 2006, Younus made a century in the third Test against England at Headingley. On 22 January 2007, he scored a matchwinning 67 not out in the 4th innings to guide Pakistan to victory over South Africa in Port Elizabeth. The five wicket win levelled the series at 1–1.

In 2005, he was one of the 15 nominees for the ICC Test Player of the Year. He is the second fastest Pakistani in terms of innings to reach 4000 Test runs, behind Javed Miandad. Younus reached the milestone in 87 innings, just one more than Sachin Tendulkar took.[8]

Younus Khan topped the ICC's Test Batting Rankings in February 2009 after an acclaimed innings of 313 in his first test as captain, in the process of helping save the match for Pakistan.[9] His ranking score of 880 is the third highest achieved by a Pakistani batsmen after Mohammad Yousuf (933), Javed Miandad (885) and just ahead of Inzamam-ul-Haq (870).He first led Pakistan against the West Indies in 2005. In September 2006, he was offered the position of captain for the course of the 2006 ICC Champions Trophy, following the suspension of Inzamam ul Haq. He turned down the offer, stating he did not want to be a "dummy captain".[11] However, on the morning of 7 October 2006 the Pakistan Cricket Board announced that Khan would lead his team in the tournament.[12] Following the resignation of Inzamam after the side's exit from the 2007 Cricket World Cup, Khan was offered the captaincy on a permanent basis, but turned it down. He blamed the angry reaction by the Pakistani public to side's early exit from the tournament.[13]

After Pakistan's 2009 2 matches to 1 defeat to Sri Lanka, PCB chairman Ijaz Butt appointed Younus Khan as the permanent captain of both the Test and ODI teams. The appointment became effective as of 27 January 2009.[14] Shortly after accepting the post Younus was quoted as saying, "I will try and fix things that aren't right at the moment...I want our team to be consistent above all, in everything we do and that will require everyone to put their hands up."[15] Younus went on to say that he expects full support from former captain Shoaib Malik whom he called a senior player in the side.Khan resigned as captain on 13 October 2009 due to an parliamentary investigation into match fixing that was alleged to have taken place during his reign. Despite being cleared in the investigation, Khan said "Yes I have submitted my resignation because I am disgusted by these match-fixing allegations made against me and the team."[16]

Khan also dropped a catch of Grant Elliott in the 2009 ICC Champions Trophy semi-final. He had a hair-line fracture in his finger prior to the match. Later PCB Chairman requested Khan to take back his resignation and Khan did it under his conditions. However after captaining the team for a three-match series against New Zealand Younis took a break for test matches in New Zealand and the series in Australia the captaincy was given to Mohammad Yousuf and since then Younis has not captained the national team.


Mohammad Younus Khan
Mohammad Younus Khan
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Younis Khan's 100 vs Sri Lanka 2011
Younis Khan 101(109)-England vs Pakistan 3rd ODI 2006 at Southampton

Shoaib Malik

Shoaib Malik Biography


Shoaib Malik (Urdu: شعیب ملک) (born 1 February 1982) is a Pakistani cricket player and former captain. He made his One-Day International debut in 1999 against the West Indies and his Test debut in 2001 against Bangladesh. He has taken over 100 ODI wickets, and has a batting average in the mid 30s in both Test and ODI cricket. His bowling action has come under scrutiny (particularly his doosra) but he has had elbow surgery to correct this. Malik was ranked second, behind teammate Shahid Afridi, in the ICC ODI all-rounder rankings in June 2008.[1] In March 2010, Malik received a one-year ban from international cricket from the Pakistan Cricket Board (PCB); the ban was overturned two months later
Shoaib Malik first played tape-ball cricket in the streets as a child. He began to take playing cricket seriously in 1993/94 when he attended Imran Khan's coaching clinics in Sialkot. He began as a batsman only developing on his bowling later. He used to get in trouble with his family for playing cricket, as they wanted him to focus on his education. In 1996, Malik attended trials for the U-15 World Cup. He was selected in the squad for his bowling.[3]

In May 2001, Malik's bowling action was inspected. The PCB group of bowling advisers concluded that his stock off-spinner was legal, although his delivery going the other way was not. He was encouraged to concentrate on his off-spin and to practice bowling his other delivery without bending his arm.[4] In a One Day International (ODI) against England in June 2001, Malik suffered a fractured right shoulder after falling awkwardly while attempting to take a catch.[5]

Malik was approached by Gloucestershire County Cricket Club in July 2003 to act as a replacement for Ian Harvey, who was on international duty with Australia. John Bracewell, the club's director of cricket, commented that he was "excited by the prospect of signing an international spinning all-rounder to replace Ian during the Cheltenham Festival and the C&G semi-finals. He will add a new and refreshing dimension to the squad ... which is in keeping with our playing philosophy to both win and entertain".[6] He sufficiently impressed in two County Championship and three one-day matches that resulted in renewing of his contract for the 2004 season. Mark Alleyne, the club's head coach, remarked that "Shoaib did very well for us last year in the short time he was with us and fitted in very well. He is a gifted all-rounder who is worthy of a place in either discipline and as a 21 year old, he can only get better and I am really pleased at having him in my squad".[7] Over the course of his two seasons at Gloucestershire, Malik played eight first-class matches, scoring 214 runs at an average of 17.83 with two fifties[8] and taking 15 wickets at an average of 45.06, with best bowling figures of 3/76.[9] He also played twelve one-day matches, scoring 345 runs at an average of 43.12 with three fifties[10] and taking 10 wickets at an average of 47.60, with best bowling figures of 3/28.[11]

In October 2004, Malik was reported to the International Cricket Council (ICC) for having a "potentially flawed bowling action";[12] eight months later, his action was cleared.[13] In the intervening period, Malik was used mainly as a batsman.[14] He was also given a one-Test ban by the Pakistan Cricket Board after admitting to deliberately losing a Twenty20 match for the Sialkot Stallions against Karachi Zebras to knock Lahore Eagles out of the Twenty-20 Cup. The inquiry concluded that the incident "damaged Pakistan's cricketing image and had shown disrespect to the crowd", but that "his actions were not part of any match-fixing with no financial implications, but were an immature attempt to express his disappointment at earlier decisions in the competition that he felt went against his side".[15]

During his Test career, Malik has batted at 5 different positions and has the unusual record of batting at every position except 11th in ODIs. Pakistan's problems in finding a reliable opening pair have led to Malik being used as an opener in Test and ODI matches. In Test cricket, he made a big impression with his match-saving innings against Sri Lanka in 2006, during which he batted for the whole day and finished with 148 runs not out. His bowling has been effective at times, especially in one-day cricket where his best bowling figures are four wickets for 19 runs (4/19) in addition to many 3-wicket hauls.

On the international stage Malik struggled in England. In 12 ODIs across four tours between 2001 and 2006 he scored 98 runs at an average of 8.16, with just two scores above 20, far below his career ODI average of 34.35. Of people who have played at least eight ODIs in England, Malik's is the furthest below his overall average.Following Inzamam-ul-Haq's resignation as Pakistan captain after the 2007 World Cup, Malik was put forward as one of the names for the captaincy along with Younis Khan and Mohammad Yousuf. After Younis Khan's rejection, Malik was the popular choice as a younger player and was seen to represent a fresh start after the Inzamam era.

Pakistan's coach, Bob Woolmer, was a strong advocate of Malik's case to become captain; in Woolmer's opinion Malik was "the sharpest tactical tack among his group ... a real presence on the field".[17] Former skipper Imran Khan also backed Malik for the role, stating "He appears to have a good cricket brain and could turn out to be a very good choice for Pakistan cricket".[18] Malik was appointed captain on 19 April 2007 by the Pakistan Cricket Board (PCB), his experience considering his relatively young age and consistent performances were cited as other reasons for his appointment.[18] At the age of just 25, he was Pakistan's fourth youngest captain.[17]

In Malik's first series as captain, Pakistan defeated Sri Lanka 2–1 in an ODI series in Abu Dhabi. His next assignments were home Test and ODI series against South Africa, which Pakistan lost 1-0 and 3-2 respectively. 3-2 was the score in favour of India when Pakistan subsequently played an ODI series against their arch-rivals. Malik hit 89 and took three wickets in the final match, which Pakistan won by 31 runs.

Malik's captaincy lasted two years. A report by the coach and manager criticised his leadership, claiming that Malik was "a loner, aloof and involved in his own little world, which is OK but not when the team required a fully committed captain  We do not see any meaningful communication between players and captain other than his five-minute talk during the team meeting".[17] Younis Khan took over as captain on 27 January 2009[19] after a poor performance against Sri Lanka saw Malik step down.[19] In his two-year tenure as captain, Malik lead his country in two Tests, losing two and drawing one,[20] and 36 ODIs, of which Pakistan won 24,[21] and 17 T20Is, winning 12.In March 2010, Malik was given a one-year ban from the national team by the PCB, who charged him with causing infighting within the team. It was part of a dramatic cull of players after Pakistan's winless tour of Australia, resulting in the fining or banning of seven players.[23] Two months later Lancashire County Cricket Club approached Malik to play for them during Twenty20 Cup. He agreed, saying "When Lancashire approached me to come and play for them I didn't hesitate in saying yes. I love playing cricket in England and the opportunity to play with a club of Lancashire's reputation was too good to pass up".[18] On 29 May 2010, Malik's ban was overturned and his Rs 2 million fine halved.[2] He was subsequently named in the 2010 Asia Cup squad,[24] and as a result, Malik pulled out of his contract with Lancashire.[25] Pakistan did not make the final of the four-team tournament,[26] and Malik played in two matches, amassing 47 runs.[27] Mailk was in Pakistan's squad to play Australia and England in England in June–August 2010, but was dropped from the side. A regular in the ODI side, over the previously 12 months he had averaged around 30 with the bat in ODIs, and excluding one score over 50, his batting average hovered around 20. Mohsin Khan, Pakistan's chairman of selectors, cited Malik's poor recent form as the reason for dropping him.


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Shoaib Malik Batting Cameo of 39 Runs [1st T20 Pak v England]
Shoaib Malik 52* of 38 Balls Vs Australia 2007 T20 World Cup

Rana Naved-ul-Hasan

Rana Naved-ul-Hasan Biography

Rana Naved-ul-Hasan (Urdu: رانانويدالحسن; born 28 February 1978) is a cricketer who plays for the Pakistani Test and One Day International teams. He also plays for Sussex County Cricket Club in England, the Hobart Hurricanes in the Big Bash League competition and Dhaka Gladiators in BPL. He has been fairly consistent in his performances overseas, both as explosive hitter with the bat and smart bowler.A right-arm fast-medium bowler capable of generating good pace with late swing, he is a genuine strike bowler. Although he was prone to leaking runs in his earlier career, of late he has used vast county experience to be economical in death overs. He often bowls the reverse-swinging yorker in one day and t20 cricket and has good control over changes of pace, though he sometimes can be expensive. Rana is also a useful attacking lower-order batsman with 5 first class hundreds and many fifties, including a score of 95 in 57 balls in a T20 game which lifted his team Sialkot Stallions to the tournament final.[1] He left playing cricket due to personal reasons during 1995-1999.Rana has only made the occasional Test appearance for Pakistan with little success, having to compete with the likes of Shoaib Akhtar, Mohammad Asif, Umar Gul and Mohammad Sami for a place in the side. As a result he has become something of an ODI specialist. The 33-year-old Pakistani bowler has a wealth of international experience, having represented his country on 87 occasions.He also boasts an exceptional pedigree in domestic Twenty20 cricket played all around the world, having amassed 75 appearances with Sialkot Stallions, Sussex Sharks, Yorkshire Carnegie, Tasmania Tigers and Hobart Hurricanes.Naved, renowned as a specialist ‘death’ bowler, has a century of Twenty20 dismissals to his name at an average of 18.93.He has also shown dashing capabilities with the bat with a highest Twenty20 score of 94 and five first-class centuries.Naved’s career with Pakistan saw him take 110 wickets in 74 one-day internationals between 2003 and 2010 and a career best of 6-27 versus India in 2005.A LV = County Championship winner with Sussex in 2006 and 2007, Naved is no stranger to the county game, having also represented Yorkshire in 2008 and 2009.Naved has been in KFC Twenty20 Big Bash action in Australia for Hobart Hurricanes, recently topping the tournament wicket-takers list with 15 dismissals in eight matches and gaining cult status with the nickname ‘The People’s Mullet.’Now regarded as one of the best ‘death’ bowlers in the game, Rana Naved has the ability to vary his pace without a discernable change in action, and without losing control. Also has the ability to bowl orthadox and reverse swing in favourable conditions.[2]Naved-ul-Hasan made his international debut at the Cherry Blossom Sharjah Cup on 4 April immediately after the poor 2003 Cricket World Cup campaign in which Pakistan were eliminated in the first round and a number of players were dropped. Playing against Sri Lanka, Rana took the wickets of Hashan Tillakaratne and Prasanna Jayawardene in consecutive balls but failed to take a hat-trick. Despite several good performances he was soon dropped from the side for alleged disciplinary problems.[3]With injuries to key members of the Pakistani pace attack he worked his way back into the side before once again falling out of favour with the national selectors and unable to stake a claim ahead of emerging young fast bowlers such as Umar Gul and Iftikhar Anjum. His career best figures are 6 for 27, made in a victory over India in Jamshedpur.On 22 July 2009, Rana recalled in Pakistan ODI squad for Sri Lanka as well as for the provisional 30-man squad for ICC Champions Trophy 2009 and a day later Pakistan Cricket Board awarded him a 'C' category contact.[4]His finest performances for Pakistan have come in ODIs against India and West Indies – 56 of his 95 wickets have come against them, but he has struggled for consistency.He also joined the Indian Cricket League (ICL) for the 2008 season, where he made a huge impact as batsman and bowler.Voted the ‘2008 Man of the Tournament’ for the guiding the Lahore Badshah’s to the ICL Championship, Rana Naved was arguably in a great form.[2]Rana was selected in the Dhaka Gladiators team in the inaugural BPL tournament, where Pakistani stars were the biggest winners, sold for a massive $100,000, $50,000 above his base price, after performing very well in the Big Bash tournament with the ball.He was the leading wicket taker in Australia’s Big Bash League in the 2011-12 edition, where he claimed 15 scalps for Hobart.


Rana Naved-ul-Hasan
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Rana's 5 Wicket Haul
Rana Naved Unbelieavable Bowled Vs Darren Powell

Danish Kaneria

Danish Kaneria

Danish Prabha Shanker Kaneria (Hindi : दानिश प्रभा शंकर कनेरिया , Urdu: دانش پربھا شنکر کنیریا) (born 16 December 1980) is a Pakistani cricketer (leg spin bowler). Danish Kaneria has continued the tradition of great Pakistani leg spin bowlers and possesses a very well disguised googly. In Test matches, Kaneria holds the record for most wickets by any Pakistani spin bowler and fourth on the list of most Test wickets over all, only behind Wasim Akram, Waqar Younis and Imran Khan
He made his international debut in 2000 against England at Faisalabad. In January 2002, he took 7 wickets for 77 runs in the Test match against Bangladesh. In Bangladesh, which are his career best figures so far in Test cricket. Earlier, in the same season, he had taken 6 wickets in an innings twice against Bangladesh during Bangladesh's tour of Pakistan. In October 2004, he took 10 wickets against Sri Lanka at Karachi, with a second-innings haul of 7/109, setting up Pakistan's 6-wicket win. More recently he has played an important role in Pakistan's Test wins over West Indies, England and India. In December 2009, He took 7/168 in the 1st innings of the 3rd Test match against New Zealand at Napier. Pakistan managed to draw that game. Since then he has not played for Pakistan
In One Day International cricket, he has been economical so far with an economy rate under 4.8 runs per over. His best bowling in ODIs came against New Zealand in Sri Lanka in 2003. He also had a good series against Zimbabwe in Sharjah just before that.

Success in the one day arena has been more elusive, Pakistan usually opting to play the two spinning all-rounders Shahid Afridi and Shoaib Malik or Saeed Ajmal instead.


Danish Kaneria
Danish Kaneria
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Danish Kaneria 11 Wickets v England 2005 Test Series
Danish Kaneria Best Wicket Ever